DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

Friday December 6, 2019

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open Monday-Saturday 9 AM to 5 PM Closed Sunday

Here's the Friday morning fishing report from the banks of the Deschutes River in Maupin, Oregon. There is still a little snow on the ground around Maupin but the streets are clear from The Dalles to Maupin and from Madras to Maupin. Coming over the mountain can be a bit tricky in the winter, but the roads are open and a few guys this morning drove over the mountain and said it was not too horrible. Overall, our temps have been quite mild and the fish are happily eating flies.

This is the time of year that our guides have pretty much wrapped up the season - we are still running trips on the Deschutes for trout and steelhead as well as trips on the John Day for steelhead - but the guides finally have some days off to do some fishing for themselves and they have been doing just that. Evan hooked two really nice steelhead swinging flies the other day - the tail on one of them was as big as my two hands. The steelhead are still fiesty and fun to catch, but we don't have a winter run here on the Deschutes, so we pretty much stop fishing for these summer fish at the end of the year and two of my guides (Alex and Nick) will move to the Oregon coast to guide for fresh, chrome-bright winter runs on the coastal waters and the Clackamas. Evan sticks around all winter and will be available for private Euro-nymphing lessons, steelhead guide trips, trout guide trips, etc. Give us a call if you want to get out there and hook some fish.

Trout fishing has been pretty outstanding lately, both using Euro-nymphing techniques and dry flies in the mid-day. The blue winged olive hatch will remain strong throughout the winter and we also have some big dark grey caddis that add to the fun. Even when I am wailing on them with my Euro-nymphing rig, I always have a dry fly rod rigged and ready for the mid-day BWO hatch.

For anyone who ventures out here in the winter, you will have miles and miles of river all to yourself. There is no reason that you need to get an early start, the fishing gets better as the air temps warm up a bit, so make your way out here at your leisure and enjoy a relaxing day of fishing. If you want to make a weekend of it, the hotels and motels in Maupin have really inexpensive winter rates and The Riverside and Rainbow Tavern are serving lunches and dinners. Pick up your breakfast and fancy coffee at the Maupin Market - and make a weekend out of it. The Maupin businesses will certainly appreciate the commerce.

We have tons of great stocking stuffers and gift ideas on our website - send your family members to shop with us! We also have gift certificates that can be used bit by bit all year long, or used in one fell swoop on a big purchase. Check out our gift offerings here: GIFTS.

We have some great sales going on right now on waders and rods and other big items - you will find those in the closeout section of our web page. CLOSEOUT. If you want anything gift wrapped, I actually love wrapping gifts, and am happy to wrap up your gift in holiday paper before mailing it to you. No extra charge, we just really appreciate the holiday business.

John and JT took off on a mission this morning - they drove to Idaho to pick out a new puppy for JT, possibly two puppies (it remains to be seen) so you will get to meet our new shop dog on your next visit to Deschutes Angler. She should have a name before they return from Idaho tonight - we are all excited to meet this little Aussie-Lab. Come on in to get your puppy fix.

Christmas is only 19 days away -and we will be open through the 21st of December then we will be closed for the one week of the year that our doors are shut: Dec 22-Jan 1. In December, we are going to be closed on Sundays, so stop by and resupply your fly boxes on Saturday afternoon if you are in town for the weekend. There will be another fishing report before the end of the year, but I will wish all of you a very happy holiday season!

Tight lines!

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 9 AM to 5 PM

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

Tuesday November 26, 2019

The weather is taking a turn on us right before the Thanksgiving holiday. We saw our first flakes of snow earlier today in Maupin and we are expected to get quite a bit of snow over the next couple of days. Our store will be closed on Thanksgiving day, but we will be open again on Black Friday - it's always fun wading through the tents and sleeping bags of all the folks who camp out on our sidewalk ready to bust down the doors on Friday morning. Ha!

In all seriousness, we are now headed into our least busy season where days will go by without a customer walking through the door and only the odd phone call to keep us on our toes. We are well stocked with great little stocking stuffers and great gift options. Check out this video:

Fly Fishing Gift Ideas from Deschutes Angler Fly Shop on Vimeo.

We have also populated a special section on our website called GIFTS.

We hope this growing page on our website can help you find some holiday treasures, OR make it easy for your loved ones to find treasures for you.

It is getting cold now but the fishing in the Deschutes is still good out here. Steelhead are sparse, but you will find them if you try. Trout are in the slower mellower water and are happily eating nymphs.

Happy Thanksgiving to all of you! Happy Shopping!

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

Saturday November 16, 2019

The weather out here is so beautiful, I expect that we will have a fair chunk of anglers cruising around this weekend. We certainly have seen a number of folks this year who normally fish on the Clearwater in Idaho. Since that river is closed, they have ventured Westward to find new places to fish. I think a lot of them are exploring the Grande Ronde River, but a handful are here on the Deschutes starting a new tradition.

Steelhead fishing remains decent - you will have to put in your time, of course, in order to find fish. There are a zillion fall chinook salmon in the river right now, digging their spawning redds and dying in droves. If you have your dog with you, keep that critter close to you because they can get very very sick from eating dead salmon. It is still so warm here that I would not be the least bit surprised to see a rattlesnake or two still cruising around.

Trout anglers have been having a blast with the heavy blue wing olive hatches - especially during the cloudy days we had earlier this week. The trout are also eating the few remaining October Caddis and are settling into the softer winter water where they don't have to work as hard swimming into the current. Not to sound like a broken record here, but Euro-nymphing is super effective and a fun way to catch a boatload of trout. We have great package deals on Euro nymph outfits that can get you into the game this winter. Have a great day!!

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 9 AM to 5 PM

Saturday, November 10, 2019 9:30 AM

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

Sunday, November 10, 2019

We had three guide boats out yesterday on the stretch of water below Sherar's Falls and above Mack's Canyon and we hooked steelhead in that stretch. So there are still biting steelhead around and they are still looking up for flies swung in the top foot of the water column. Mild weather this week has been great for anglers fishing for both trout and for steelhead - it is downright balmy today. The cold snap in the midwest and east is not scheduled to hit Maupin, so that bodes well for the fishing.

Trout anglers will be pleased to know that there are still some decent hatches around. From here through the winter you should always be ready for a mid-day blue winged olive hatch. October caddis are slowing down but there are some smaller caddis in brown/olive bodies about size 14. Those are the dry fly hatches. If you choose to nymph fish, you will want to get down using some tungsten-head flies and tight line nymphing works well (also called Euro or Czech nymphing). Indicator fishing is a little less effective, but will still work for you. The reason it is less effective is that the indicator causes a lot of drag on your flies down deep. The surface currents are faster than the current near the bottom of the river, so any float that you have will drag your deep sunk flies unnaturally downstream. The dead drift time is severely limited by the indicator speed on the surface. Without an indicator, the faster surface current can move past the leader without causing the flies to drag. The thinner, overall, your leader happens to be, the less drag you will have and the more natural the flies will look. The more natural the flies look, the more fish you will catch.

Until they freeze, our private lakes are open and fishing well. Want to catch steelhead sized rainbow trout? Want to catch them on dry flies? Give us a call.

Tight lines,

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 9 AM to 5 PM

Saturday, November 4, 2019 9:00 AM

This is a quick update to let you know that we are still open 7 days a week but we will be opening at 9:00 AM instead of 8:00 AM. We will still be open until 5:00 PM. The forecast for the week looks beautiful, so get out here for some great fishing weather!!

Tight lines! Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Saturday, November 2, 2019 9:00 AM

With morning temperatures in the teens and a lot of fresh white snow on the mountain, I am going to go out on a limb here by declaring that the White River SHALT NOT muddy the Deschutes River for the rest of the year. This was, by far, the worst year for White River water conditions that I can remember. The blow outs were random, unexpected, and bad. Could this be another gift of global warming? I am not a fan of dams, at all, but they could have dammed the White River long ago and no anadromous fish would have been harmed by doing so - White River Falls is an impassible barrier to migration and we could have clear cold water coming into the Deschutes year-round. Of course I am joking about damming the White, I love me a free-flowing river, but one day a genius fisherman will invent a giant coffee-filter device that we could simply install temporarily at a narrow spot on the White River and I would never again have to report about the blow outs. A person can dream....

Steelhead anglers are toughing it out on the Deschutes on these cold mornings - we are keeping them warm with a steady supply of handwarmers, gloves, beanies, and ice-off paste for their fly rods. The smart guys are getting a later start and allowing a little bit of warmth to envelop the river before standing in waist-deep water. One of the items that absolutely changed the game for my winter steelhead fishing was the purchase of a pair of bootfoot waders. Yep, they are expensive, but no more so than buying a pair of waders and a pair of boots - only these boots are connected to the waders. These can truly be a gamechanger for anglers in pursuit of desert steelhead in frigid conditions.

Trout fishing continues to save the day/weekend/trip for anglers who love all of the challenges that the Deschutes can offer. I do love swinging for steelhead, but I also like to take a little time during my mid-day break to explore new spots for trout. The blue wing olive hatches have been off the charts and October Caddis activity has been strong this year in the evenings. If these dry fly hatches don't happen for you on the river, you will always find good trout by exploring the depths drag-free while Euro nymphing. I don't think there is a happier angler that walks into our shop than the angler who walked out of the shop a few days before with his/her first Euro nymphing set-up. After a brief learning period sprinkled with frustrating tangles, missed fish, and broken off flies, things start to click with the Euro outfit and catch rates start to skyrocket. Happy anglers full of fish stories and pictures of their catches make for good vibes in the shop. The great thing is, the entry level Euro packages are very affordable and the return on investment is EXCELLENT. Stop in and let us show you how you can change your life on the river.

Our private lakes are still open for business and they have been fishing really well. Our friend, Mitch, stopped in yesterday to reserve a day on the lakes and he reminded me of how he first came to fish the ranch lakes - I had he and his wife scheduled for a Deschutes trip one spring and the water conditions on the day of our trip turned out to be very poor. I encouraged them to switch gears and let me take them up to the lakes for the day. Mitch was hesitant because he fishes a lot of lakes back in Washington and the river was really the reason for the trip, but he gave our lakes a try and has been booking a day or two on the lakes every year since. These shallow basin lakes are small and manageable in a float tube, they are full of huge rainbows, the rainbows are accustomed to eating dry flies most of the day, and the hatches on the lakes are prolific. To sit in a float tube on a 20-30 acre body of water while heads and backs and tails break the glassy surface of the water all around your tube, turns out, is pretty darn fun! If they are not eating on the surface, you can bet that they are lurking a few feet down waiting to pounce on a midge, a water boatman, a swimming damsel or callibaetis, or looking for a juicy leech. We have to warn anglers to never take their hand off the fly rod while the fly is in the water - lest your fly gets violently mauled by a 22" trout, ripped from your float tube, and skimmed across the surface of the lake for a few seconds before sinking to the bottom. It has happened countless times. Big fish having their way with your flies....if you can't find the magic on the river, the lakes are always an option in the spring and fall.

We have just stocked up on some amazing holiday gifts - all price ranges of gift ideas are available here at Deschutes Angler. If you love this fishing report and love our dedication to bringing you the latest river updates throughout the year, please consider doing a little holiday shopping with us this year. You can find lots of goodies online, of course, and we are adding new items daily. Or, you can do what lots of our customers do, give us a call, talk to a real person in a real fly shop and support local small business. We appreciate it more than you could imagine - Maupin is VERY quiet from now through March. Thanks! Tight lines,

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Wednesday, October 25, 2019 9:00 AM

The White River continued to be a huge pain in the rear all week - blowing out on Wednesday morning but coming into shape enough yesterday to be fishable below the falls. I assume it is still holding strong with decent visibility below the confluence - but will post otherwise if I hear otherwise today.

Steelhead conditions might be improving, but we are working hard and searching hard to find steelhead in the Deschutes these days. There seems to be a lull in activity, not a lot of fish migrating through at the moment, but the ones that we have been catching are what we call October Brights. These are the big wild fish that come into the river in the latter half of October and often tip the scales at 10-15 lbs. So, the quantity is off a little bit but the quality is there if you get lucky enough to swing one up.

If you want to chase trout, they are there and they are eating steadily in order to pack on the pounds before winter. This is a transitional time for the trout so they will be moving around in the river and heading towards the slower deeper pools and backeddies where they can spend a relaxing winter not fighting the current. If you are not finding trout in one spot, keep moving.

This is a great time to be on the river in the Maupin area and our Halloween parties this weekend are epic - featuring live music at both the Imperial River Company and The Riverside and costume contests on Saturday night! Be there or be square!

Tight lines, Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler

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DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Wednesday, October 20, 2019 9:00 AM

Over the last couple of days we have had quite a bit of heavy rain and generally foul weather. Today is a perfect fishing day - it is calm and overcast and cool but not cold. I was curious about the state of the White River this morning, so I took the time to drive down the road to check out the impact that the White might be having on the Deschutes. Since I drove over the White River yesterday on HWY 197, I knew how thick and latte-like the White was, but I wasn't certain of the volume until this morning when I was standing just downstream of the White River campground. The situation as of 8:45 this Sunday morning was ugly. The Deschutes is quite muddy and I would say with some level of certainty that the Deschutes has less than one foot of visibility below the confluence with the White, maybe less than 6 inches currently. As the two rivers mix and the flow continues down stream, some of the mud will settle out a little bit and you may have two feet of visibility 20 or so miles downstream, but this will take a day or so to settle down. Barring any additional rain, the river below the White may be in fishable shape by Tuesday.

For a weekend during prime time steelhead fishing season, there were lots of open places to fish between town and the White River. I could have stopped to fish at least 7-8 unoccupied great pieces of steelhead water in the 8 miles of pavement leading downstream of Maupin. I saw a few vehicles drive down past the White, stop, and turn around to drive back upstream once they saw the mud. Most people didn't seem to really know exactly where to fish, but there were a few anglers fishing prime water. Instead of seeing 2-3-4 guys in each well-known classic stretch of steelhead water, I saw maybe one angler but often zero anglers in those stretches.

Finding a piece of great steelhead water takes more than just a few visits or a few tries fishing said water. It often takes years to know if a piece of steelhead water is consistently productive for steelhead. This is why you won't find too many shops or anglers drawing you a map of all the great spots along the river. Each great steelhead spot is hard-earned and most anglers prefer to keep those spots secret. There is no substitute for time spent on the river and no fast-track instant way to become a steelhead angler. Hours and days and months and years of on-the-water time, often cold, wet, on-the-water time are what it takes to truly become a steelheader. Going back to the water day after day getting blanked sometimes for 7 or 19 or 25 or more trips in a row before connecting with a steelhead, this is normal. A steelheader doesn't complain, doesn't whine, doesn't question his/her methods or change to some dumbed-down method, a true steelheader is an angler who sets mind to catching a steelhead in a manner that they love and sticks with that method of fishing until successful. It seems crazy to most, and it is not everyone's cup of tea, but for those of us who love the pursuit of steelhead it seems to make total sense.

If steelhead fishing is not your bag, then you will find great joy in the trout fishing at this time of year. The traffic is light, the good spots are nearly always open, and we have enough excitement on the surface with blue winged olives and October caddis to keep the dry fly enthusiasts happy. Euro nymphers are absolutely laying waste to trout all through the cooler fall and cold winter months - times of year when trout fishing has always been a little more challenging.

We hope to see you on the water or in the fly shop befoer you hit the water! Tight lines,

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 8:00 AM

Good morning from the metropolis of Maupin where steelhead and trout outnumber the people and visiting anglers are welcome to come join the fun that this town has to offer. This Friday there will be a screening of the film "Artifishal" from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM at the Imperial River Company. The event is FREE and is sponsored by the Maupin Area Chamber of Commerce, Native Fish Society, and Patagonia. There will be a representative from NFS on hand to answer any questions you may have about the film after the screening. This is a great place to meet other anglers who care about the Deschutes and the steelhead that swim her waters.

Wow, that is the first report I have written in ages that didn't start with some snippet about the White River. I know that is what most of you really care about so here's the news on that front: the White River is incredibly muddy. FILTHY. Zero visibilty in the White River, folks. HOWEVER, the flow of the White at this point in time does not have the volume to negatively impact the Deschutes below the confluence of the two rivers. The forecast calls for rain, which could, of course, change the volume of the White River in the coming days. We will keep you posted in the event that a change occurs. Steelhead fishing has been pretty steady lately - although the river volume was jacked up when irrigation stopped on the upper Deschutes. The spike in the water levels made steelhead fishing very slow on the first day after the spike, but the steelhead were grabby the next day and Evan's clients got three. We have perfect cloud cover for all-day fishing right now. All of our fish have been hooked on floating lines and small fly patterns like the Addison, Lum Plum, and Steelhead Coachman (all three patterns were developed and created on the Deschutes by our Deschutes Angler family).

The steelhead are in the river, they are aggressive, and this is it folks, prime time! If you want to catch lots of fish, then trout fishing will be your focus. We have seen some excellent mayfly hatches as well as craneflies and October Caddis. There will be some dry fly fishing sprinkled throughout the day as these hatches come off, so keep a dry fly rod handy and spend the rest of your day nymphing the depths.

Our lakes have been super fun and productive this fall. The weeds are slowly dying back and the trout are actively feeding in order to build up bulk for the winter. If you need to feel steelhead-sized trout on the end of your fly line, give us a call and we will get you booked on one of our private lakes.

Tight lines, Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Thursday, October 10, 2019 8:30 AM

Got a huge surprise last night, and not a good one, when John pulled off of the river and found that the further up river he drove the muddier the Deschutes looked. Muddier and muddier until the river had only 1-2 INCHES of visibility - damn that White River! When will it be done with this nonsense?? It is COLD out here in the morning - low 20s this morning and last, so bring your warm gear for the early morning fishing sessions. We have been hooking steelhead and trout consistently over the past few weeks, though we are mostly fishing for steelhead at this time of year. Evan spent the day fishing with Devin Olson (Euro-nymphing expert) yesterday and they hooked steelhead swinging flies before exploring the depths of the river using Euro-nymphing techniques. They proceeded to hook tons of trout during the mid-day and a few more steelhead that were willing to grab a tiny nymph. Sounded like a great day, and everyone drove off the river just before the Wicked White River had her way with the lower Deschutes. It should clear quickly, so we will keep you informed of that development.

The private lakes are open and fishing really well right now - reports from anglers who have ventured up there in recent weeks have been excellent.

We are gearing up for the John Day season now - lots of camp trips going out for in the coming weeks and the John Day has a decent amount of water in it. There are still a couple of spots up for grabs, so think about an amazing four day float amongst wild steelhead, guided by the best in the business. Our camps on the John Day are second to none - we have two camp hosts who are paid to do nothing more than make sure your camping experience is top-notch. You will enjoy stand-up walk-around canvas tents for sleeping, a huge wall tent for dining and hanging out, a circle of chairs around a fire pit every evening, and phenomenal knock-your-socks-off meals cooked hot and fresh on the water.

Get yourself out to the river any way you can or this steelhead season is going to pass you by.

Tight lines! Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler.

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Friday, October 4, 2019 5:50 AM

Friday morning fishing report brought to you by Amy Hazel.... Not much time to write, gotta guide. White River is probably done acting up for this year. Cold crisp temps and snow on the mountain have locked it down. Steelhead fishing has been decent in the lower 50 miles below the falls. Numbers of fish coming above the falls have improved over the past week. This is prime time on the Deschutes for steelhead, so now is the time to get off the couch and get to the river! Have a great weekend. Tight lines! Amy Hazel

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Friday, September 27, 2019 8:30 AM

Friday morning fishing report brought to you by Amy Hazel.... Yesterday morning, I drove down to the White to take a look. It was so, I figured the river down low had about 2-3 feet of visibility. This morning, John and our former shop manager, Andrew Dutterer, went steelhead fishing down below the White River. I talked to them just before 8:00 AM and was pleased to hear that they had just landed their first steelhead in a spot that Andrew named years ago: The Catcher's Mitt. This morning the visibility in the lower river is decent - John says 2-3 feet. The steelhead that Andrew hooked and landed was caught while swinging an unweighted small hairwing fly (Dutt's Addison)on floating line - no sink tip needed. However, not long after that conversation, Nick drove down river to take a group on a trout trip and turned around when he saw how bad the White River had become. So, my guess is that a huge mudflow just hit the Deschutes and will be working its way downriver over the next 24 hours. Alex called me at 10:00 AM to say that the water he was fishing (and his guys got one steelhead so far this morning) was looking dirtier and dirtier, so the mud was probably just reaching him at that time. John just got back to the shop at 11:30 and said he thought the White River sent a little mud down at 9:00 and as he drove up river it seemed to be getting clearer. So, there you go...

Conditions of the lower Deschutes are ever changing. The steelhead return is rumored to be poor, but we are not finding the doom and gloom forecast to be exactly true. In the past week we have hooked and landed quite a few steelhead on our guided trips. John, visiting from NYC, was pleased to hook his first ever dry fly skated steelhead (on a bomber) as well as bunches more on muddlers. Rick and Dick did a camp trip with Evan and brought several steelhead to hand. The steelhead are spread out throughout the river at this point.

Yesterday, Oregon and Washington Fish and Wildlife added the Columbia River to the list of rivers closed to steelhead and salmon fishing. This will, no doubt, put more pressure on rivers like the Deschutes, the Klickitat, the Hood, the John Day, and the Grande Ronde.

Tomorrow - Saturday - the Deschutes River Alliance will be participating in the river clean up with the BLM in the morning from 9 AM to Noon followed by a BBQ here in Maupin in the park right next to our shop. We will be there cooking up burgers and hot dogs, there will be microbrew beer from Freebridge Brewing in the Dalles, and we can meet and greet all of the anglers who love the Deschutes and want to see it protected. We will have a few tents set up just in case, but the forecast that once called for rain has been adjusted to a 29% chance of a shower and the wind forecast has also been dialed back. Come on down if you can, the more the merrier!

Trout fishing has continued to be good on the Deschutes. Nymphs that represent caddis pupa or Euro nymphs with hot spots have been working very well for people. Tomorrow the blue winged olive hatch should be epic with the overcast weather and hint of rain.

As I was finishing up this fishing report, I got a call from a guy who came out here this week to camp on the river's edge and enjoy some trout fishing. He did what most of us do when we arrive at a campsite, he staked his claim to the site by laying out his camp stove, BBQ, Lantern, cooler full of food, etc. His stuff was on a picnic table at Longbend Campground - just upstream from Maupin and right out in the open. He drove upriver to fish, came back down river, saw his stuff at the campground, went down river to fish and returned to find all of his camping stuff GONE. Stolen. This is very rare on the Deschutes, but it can happen. The guy told me that he saw a suspicious beater grey car parked near the campsite with a couple of guys in it, but he thought nothing of it. Keep an eye on your stuff and hopefully these guys will be caught.

Tight lines!

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 24, 2019 5:30 AM

67,000 steelhead are swimming in the Columbia River basin this year. 67,000. To many of you, particularly to those who have been steelhead fishing for decades, this number is low and quite disappointing because of what you have seen in years past. To those budding enthusiasts who have picked up a two-handed rod for the first time in the past couple of years, this is your normal. In this world of changing climate and ocean blobs, this is likely the New Normal - but we are uncertain about that because salmon and steelhead are amazingly resilient creatures who take on challenges like changing their bodies to adapt to living in saltwater after being reared in freshwater, like swimming downstream as little tiny babies and navigating through several dams, dodging seals, sea lions, cormorants, orcas, and other fish in the ocean. They survive and thrive somehow despite all of the obstacles they face, swimming hundreds of miles upstream as adults to reach their home waters. Once they have reentered the freshwater environment, they must navigate around gill nets that are strung throughout the Columbia River. One wrong turn could mean entanglement and a slow death by drowning while the nylon net rips the slime and scales off of their writhing bodies. Since they are not the prized Salmon, they are more likely to be tossed overboard to float belly up down the Columbia than they are to take up space in a cooler full of Chinook bound for a fish market on the side of I-84. If they are lucky enough to make their journey without dying in a gill net, they enter their chosen tributary and start moving upstream, holding temporarily in front of big boulders to surf the cushion of a wave and to catch a quick rest. Some will yield to their predator instinct or maybe to curiosity when a fly swings through their window of vision- a muddler dancing in the surface film will not go unnoticed by any steelhead - and they will take a fly into their mouth and turn with it before feeling the sting and the weight of the piercing in the corner of the mouth. Fight. Flight. A high leap and a cartwheel may help spit the hook, or it may just be the thing that thrills the angler on the other end of the line and fuels the fire to return to the river season after season in hopes of another such encounter.

John picked his clients up this morning in the pre-dawn darkness. They have been fishing with him 3-4 trips per year for at least 25 years. The trips have shortened over those many years from 5 days to 2-3 days, not because of the fishing but because of the wear and tear on the 60, 70, and 80 year old bodies. There are a million little reasons that they might throw in the towel and call it quits - but they are still making their annual pilgrimage to the Deschutes to fish for steelhead also on a pilgrimage. Balance fades with age, so wading staffs, knee braces, and inflatable safety vests are are commonly being donned as the guys gear up each morning - headed out to battle the swift river currents and slippery rocks. Ron, who is fishing with his brother this week, is here for his second trip in two weeks. He has one more trip next month. He comes for two days at a crack now, enough time to put in a solid effort without complete and total exhaustion at the end of the trip. Ron is an incredible and prolific fly tyer who has been an inspiration to me and all of my guides. After last week’s trip, Ron left his gear bag and fly boxes (six suitcase fly boxes and countless Wheatley boxes) with us and asked us to choose our favorite flies from box after box of spectacular patterns. John and I poured over the thousands of flies and chose our favorites, which we set into three different framed display cases. You can check them out here in the shop.

While I was writing this report in the pre-dawn hours, I got a phone call from John just after he launched his boat. Ron had left his gear bag containing fly boxes and his wallet sitting in front of his hotel room at the Deschutes Motel. I jumped into the old Landcrusier and climbed up the hill to the motel with the choke knob pulled out to the max. There was the bag, sitting next to the shoes that Ron had ditched just before climbing into his waders. I grabbed it and headed down the hill and down the river just as it was starting to get light enough to fish. I passed by five or six of my favorite steelhead runs and was shocked to see them all wide open during the prime time of late September. As I approached the White River I was confident that I would see it in the same condition that I had seen it in 16 hours before, as the weather is cold and there has not been any rain to speak of. Nope. It was significantly higher in volume and thicker in muddiness – enough so that the Deschutes below the confluence looked fairly brown. As I drove down river to find John and the boys, the river cleared somewhat and looked quite good by the time I reached the spot they were fishing. I delivered the gear bag and mentioned that a mud plume might be headed their way. As I drove back up river, there was no doubt that the river got dirtier and dirtier as I neared the confluence with the White River. Was the mud settling out as it flowed downstream? Or, was this the beginning of a big mud plume? Without setting up camp at the White River Campground to watch the mixing of the dirty and clean water for the next few hours, it was impossible to know. What I do know is that I check on and report on the White River more than anyone on the planet. It is a thankless job with no reward. I get yelled at by people in the fly shop because the White River got muddy between the time they read my report and the time they arrived in Maupin. I have been accused of RUINING people’s trips because they brought their jet boat and found the river too muddy to fish after their first day of fishing clean water. Somehow, I am to blame when Mother Nature changes the White River. I saw a fishing bulletin board online yesterday where a guy says this:

“Got word from fly shop in Maupin yesterday morning that White River was muddy but not affecting Deschutes with very low flow. I packed up and drove down. WRONG! Turned around and headed home. Perfect above White but fish not there yet in numbers.”

Really? You drove all the way here and you stood on the edge of the Deschutes where the conditions were perfect and you turned around and headed home? While you stood there and determined that the river was not fishable – if you were here on the 10th of September – I had three guide boats below the White and all of them hooked steelhead. I had one boat above the White and they hooked steelhead. How does this guy determine the numbers of fish above the White River? After the Dalles dam there is NO ACCURATE COUNT of the steelhead migrating. ODFW has a guy at Sherar’s Falls on some of the days trapping a few migrating fish at night, but he traps only those fish that utilize the fish ladder during a very short window of time – not the hundreds or thousands that migrate as they have done for millennia by jumping up the falls. I talk to lots of anglers in this shop and lots of guides working the river. There are plenty of steelhead being hooked above Maupin and have been since mid-July.

Fishing conditions are unpredictable. That is part of the adventure. Even with today’s technologies, there will always be some measure of steelhead fishing that will remain a mystery. Will the steelhead be in the runs that I choose to fish? If they are there, will they follow my fly? Will they like the fly I have chosen? Will they (or even one fish) be willing to grab my fly? If I get lucky and a steelhead does grab my fly, will it turn hard and run or will it drop slowly back and feel like a slow and steady pull of the loop from my fingers? Should I carry a loop? Should I fish floating line? Would a sink tip work better? Are water temperatures too warm? Is the sun at a good angle, or is it blinding the steelhead sitting in this run? Should I change my tippet size? SO many questions float through the angler’s mind in the faint light in the wee hours of the day.

Personally, I fish with total confidence with the floating line, unweighted small hairwing pattern or muddler, and a floating leader. I have seen hundreds of steelhead come to the surface to grab a fly. I have watched hundreds come up to inspect a size 3 fly with flash only to turn away at the last second without touching it but the very same fish will crush a size 8 hairwing pattern minutes later.

Confidence is key to success in steelhead fishing. Confidence comes from lots of experience. Confidence is gained through time on the water, through trial and error, and through time spent with other anglers more experienced than oneself. You must have confidence in your fly pattern. You must be confident that the water you are fishing is prime, grade A steelhead water – the most likely runs to hold steelhead during their journey upriver. The great thing is that the river is far less busy this year and that opens up quite a bit of the GRADE A water. Another great thing is that wild steelhead make up over 50% of this year’s run, where they only made up 20-25% of the run on big number years. The greater the percentage of wild fish, the better, because they are far more aggressive to the fly than their hatchery counterparts. So, the percentage of grabby fish is up and that should get any fly angler excited.

We are about to announce on social media a couple of openings during our six week season on the John Day River. Here is a 100% wild steelhead tributary of the Columbia which fishes well through November and December if the weather allows. We run the best outfitted camp trips on the John Day River, doing all the work of rowing and moving camps down river while you enjoy luxury safari-style tent camping with gourmet meals and lots of camaraderie around the campfire. I know that some of you normally fish the Clearwater in Idaho in late October or November and, unfortunately, Idaho has recently closed the Clearwater to steelhead fishing. Here is your chance to experience another Northwest gem with some of the finest steelhead guides on the planet. Give us a call at the fly shop if you want to get one of our remaining john Day camp trip spots.

Private lakes are open now and getting less weedy by the day as the cool nights become the norm. We can accommodate quite a few groups on our private lakes, so give us a ring if you want to go hook a bunch of nice fat rainbows.

Tight lines,

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 23, 2019 6:30 PM

Checked the White River this afternoon around 1:00 PM - it was muddy but the Deschutes below the confluence looked great. It could change. However, fresh snow on the mountain and the weather getting colder bodes well for the river staying clear and fishable for the rest of the year. If things change, we will keep you posted. Tight lines!

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 20, 2019 9:15 AM

We drove down to the White River this morning to check things out and it looks like it has dropped a bit and is on its way to clearing. I would estimate visibility down in the lower river to be 2 feet or slightly better. We hope it continues to improve but rain showers may cause it to get worse.

Tight lines! Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 19, 2019 7:40 AM

Just woke up to the news that the rain finally pushed the levels of the White River way up and it is now blowing out the entire Deschutes. Over the previous two days, the rain was falling but the White River held up and we were fishing on the lower river with success. Unfortunately, that all changed sometime last night and the lower river is now a mess. We fielded a lot of phone calls yesterday and gave people the news that the White was still okay - which it was through about 6:00 PM yesterday the last time we looked at it. We will let you know when the situation changes. I have a class this morning and will try to get down there to take a photo. I can't post it here, so you will have to follow deschutesangler on Instagram or Facebook to see the photos. Tight lines! Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 11, 2019 10:10 AM

Just drove down to the White River confluence to take a look and (right now) the volume of the White River is too low for the muddy water joining the Deschutes to have a negative impact of fishing the lower 50 miles of the river. As long as the cooler weather continues and we don't have any major rain events, the lower Deschutes should remain in good shape.

If you like fishing clearer water, then you may want to fish in the Maupin area. There are not as many steelhead up above the falls as you will find below the falls, but fishing clear clean water does have a certain appeal. The fish are distributed throughout the system, which is normal for this time of year, though the fishermen are few and far between. It should be quite easy to fish the prime pieces of water - you have almost zero competition. On my drive to the White River this morning I saw maybe 6 people fishing in a 7-8 mile stretch of river. Nearly all of those people had big indicators on their fly rods so they appear to be trout fishing or perhaps nymphing for steelhead. Don't hesitate to follow a nymph fisherman through a classic big run, they cover very little of the water using nymphs. Swinging flies will cover 50 times the area of water that nymphing will in a fraction of the time. The only problem in following a nymph angler down a run could be the pace at which they are moving. Nymphing tends to be quite stationary, so you might go fish a different piece of water and return to the run where the nympher was later to reach all the spots he/she missed.

Today is the 18 year anniversary of the 9/11 attack on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon. I was guiding two steelhead anglers on the river above Maupin on that day, floating from Nena to Wapinitia for the morning session, taking a mid-day break, and planning to fish along the road in the afternoon. I had a great morning and it was a beautiful day just like this one. I remember my clients hooking 3-4 steelhead in the morning, and one of the rare circus trains came up the tracks with all the animals in cages and the circus freaks hanging out the windows watching the river go by. At lunchtime, we pulled into the boat ramp and a bagger from a trout trip upriver told us that something horrible had happened in New York City and thousands were dead. We quickly ate lunch, loaded the boat on the trailer, and drove down river with the local radio station playing country music - no news at all about what was going on. I dropped the guys at their hotel (C&J Lodge) to take a nap in the A/C and I drove home to see what the fuss was all about. I turned on the TV and couldn't believe what I was seeing - the towers had fallen by that time and everyone on the news was freaking out. I looked over at the blinking light on the answering machine and listened to panicked messages from the family members of the people who were on guided trips with John and with Dec Hogan who was working for us at the time. One message was from a wife desperate to connect with her husband and kids, the other was from Dec's wife, another was from my mom, and so on. Knowing that the guys dwn river should have an idea of what was going on, I drove down river like a maniac in order to find John. By this time there were no commercial jets anywhere to be found in the wide open skies above Maupin, but there were fighter jets zipping around. I found John and his guys napping across the river and yelled out to them. John rowed over to get me and rowed me back so that I could tell everyone what had happened. One guy hiked to the top of the canyon to try to get a cell signal to call his wife. John shrugged and said that there was nothing we could do about it, so their fishing day went on as planned. He rowed me back across the river and I went to the hotel that afternoon to pick my guys up to fish the evening session. It was an eerie day. That night at the Rainbow Tavern we watched the towers fall over and over again and made plans for what to do in the coming week since none of our out of town clients could get to Maupin - all flights were cancelled. Some clients drove up from California or down from Washington, and we went on fishing as usual. Patriotism was at an all-time high - American Flag bumper stickers appeared on every vehicle and the stars and stripes were on display everywhere at half mast. It wasn't until days later that I learned that one of my high school classmates, Gordy Aamoth, was in the Twin Towers that day. Gordy was 32 and pursuing his dream of being an investment banker. Unfortunately, Gordy did not make it out of the building and perished on that day. His name is alphabetically the first one on the list of 9/11 victims that they read aloud each year. The football stadium at my high school is named after Gordy, and the school erected a 9/11 memorial on campus which features a beam from the twin towers. My thoughts on this day are with the Aamoth family and the families of so many others who were lost that horrible day. May we never forget.

Tight lines, Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 9, 2019

The power was out for about an hour this morning, so our phones were down and the lights were off. It just came on at 9:30 AM and we are back in business! Before work I drove down the river to see what the conditions are right now. We had some more rain last night and I was worried about the White River jumping in volume. The good news is that the White River is still low and, though it is the color of a latte or a chocolate milkshake, the White River is not putting enough color into the lower Deschutes to negatively impact the steelhead fishing below the confluence. The lower river will have a tinge of steelhead green water, but it is not too bad right now.

The small tributaries that caused the Deschutes to be a muddy mess yesterday morning have all dried up and are no longer dirtying the Deschutes above the White River. Things have cooled off around here and the forecast calls for a few more sprinkles today but no serious rain.

What is interesting to me is that I did not see one single steelhead or trout angler this morning as I drove down to the White River and back. I guess people are looking at the Columbia River dam counts and they are making the decision that the steelhead run is too low to be worth chasing steelhead this year. Well, there are really no promises out there that future years will be better, so I would go fishing now and enjoy the opportunities that we have presently. There are at least 11,000 steelhead above The Dalles dam that could potentially be headed up the Deschutes river and there are over 60,000 steelhead in the Columbia river above Bonneville dam. Those are huge numbers, folks, huge. They may be a fraction of what we once had, but they are still huge numbers of steelhead with potential to swim into the Deschutes River. If you sit at home waiting for things to get better, you are certain to get skunked!

Trout fishing is solid right now, and you can read a bit more about that in other fishing reports below. This report was focused mainly on the ever changing condition of the Deschutes River and the White River in particular.

Tight lines, Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 8, 2019

We had a huge series of thunderstorms here last night which caused the entire river to blow out - but temporarily. We had a push of mud coming through between 7 AM and 8 AM, then the river above the bridge in Maupin cleared up quickly and the main tributary spewing mud was Bakeoven Creek which enters the Deschutes just downstream from the bridge in Maupin. Bakeoven is causing the Deschutes to have a brown hue all the way down to the White River and below. The White River this morning at 9:30 AM was not bad - the river itself is super muddy but the volume of water is fairly low and is not causing major problems on the lower Deschutes. At least not right now.

I was in Canada last week on the Bulkley River, so a fishing report did not get written while I was gone, but the White River has continued to impact the lower Deschutes off and on for the past 8-9 days. If you have a trip planned for the lower section of the Deschutes, go for it. You may lose a few hours here and there with surges of muddy water pushing out of the White, but there will be big open windows of clear enough water to enjoy swinging a fly on a floating line. The hot weather may be behind us now, and the rains on Mt. Hood are turning into snow. This is the time of year I love the most - here comes the crisp, cold, fall weather (hopefully)!

For those BC steelhead enthusiasts who are curious about the week of fishing I just had on the Bulkley - the river did not have a lot of fish in the system. We had four good anglers and a jet boat and we fished hard for five days from Smithers up and down river - up as far as Telkwa and downstream a ways from Smithers. The river was in perfect shape, but the steelhead were few and far between. One angler in our party landed a steelhead. One. No other steelhead were hooked, boiled, bumped, or encountered. None. It was still a really fun trip with a bunch of great guys, but the steelhead did not participate in the trip. The bears did! We saw 1-4 black bears each day, several times they walked down to the river while we were fishing a run, got a drink of water, and walked back into the woods to nap. The game warden on our last day on the Bulkley said that he had checked 78 anglers over two weeks from Telkwa downstream below Smithers and Derek (the guy in our group) was the first guy he had checked who had landed a steelhead. We fished floating lines, skaters, muddlers, wet flies and even a sink tip though a couple of runs, just to check. The fish were just not around during the week that we were there. On the bright side, conditions were good so the fishing should pick up as soon as a few more steelhead enter the Bulkley. At the airport we talked to anglers coming off the Babine where the fishing was also tough but not completely void of fish. After last year's big returns up on the Skeena drainage, there are bound to be a few anglers with expectations that will be difficult to meet. But, that is steelhead fishing. No matter what you spent to get to the destination, no matter how much you spent on your gear, no matter how great the flies are that you tied for months leading up to the trip, the river doesn't OWE you anything. YOU owe the river and the fish for giving you the opportunity to stand in one of the most beautiful places on earth and do something that you love to do. The rhythm of the casting and the quiet solitude of our wild steelhead rivers are gifts to your soul in equal measure, I would argue, as the boil on a dry fly or the yank on a wet. It is rare to set aside so many hours in a week for simple quiet reflection while swinging a fly. No phone, no internet, no music, no distractions other than the birds flitting in the trees just far enough away to escape positive identification or the odd black bear wandering the banks or swimming the river to get to the island on the other side.

Trout fishing should be good once the dirtier water flushes out of the Bakeoven creek. The drainage is short, so we expect that the muddy waters of the Deschutes just below Maupin will clear quickly today.

Tight lines,

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

August 28, 2019

The White River has been surging with mud on and off for the past five days. Each surge brings a lot of mud and a wave of dirty, zero-visibility water that will push its ugliness all 47 miles to the mouth angering fishermen all along the way. These waves are not entirely predictable, but there is clean water to be found somewhere in the lower Deschutes River at some time during the day. If you have two-three feet of visibility in the morning session of fishing, you might expect dirty water to reach you by the afternoon-evening session. As the water flows downstream, since it is more mud than silt, the dirt seems to settle out a bit with each river mile it flows.

I have no idea how long the White River will continue to do this to the Deschutes, it might end today or it may last until the weather up on the mountain gets down into freezing temperatures in the evenings. I am not a geologist, hydrologist, or volcanologist, but the blow out might be due to thermal venting on the volcano heating up long frozen parts of the glacier and causing them to melt quickly. That is one interesting theory. A less intriguing theory is that the glacier melts during the heat of the day, the river jumps in volume and silt, and the mud surge makes its way down the White River then down the Deschutes River. On Sunday the worst of the mud seemed to be flowing out of the White River between 3:00 PM and 6:00 PM. I have not been driving down to the confluence of the White and Deschutes every day multiple times per day, so I cannot say that the timing of the mud surges is consistent daily or completely random. If anyone wants to spend their day sitting at White River Campground watching and documenting the color of the White River as it changes throughout the day, please let me know how that day of observation goes.

The good news for all of you anglers is this: unless you have committed to a float in the lower section of the river or a jet boat trip, it is possible to make a change of plans to allow yourself the option to fish in the super clean and clear water of the Deschutes above the confluence with the White River. From Maupin, you have 15 miles of crystal clean steelhead water to fish between the confluence of the White River and a few miles above the locked gate. A fair percentage of the steelhead in the Deschutes have made their way to the Maupin area to enjoy the cooler water temperatures as they swim farther and farther from the mouth and from the lower river where the water is warmer and slower.

Steelhead will migrate up and down the Deschutes from now until the months of February and March when they get ready to spawn. They don't stay in one place and they don't read the reports from various sources that place the entire run of Deschutes steelhead in the stretch of river below Mack's Canyon. They are spread out everywhere and will continue to spread out for the next five months, the bigger fish finding the best holding water in each boulder-strewn run on the river. All you have to do is go out on the water, cover as much water as you possibly can, and hope that you have an encounter with a steelhead that is willing to grab your fly.

If steelhead are causing you frustration and you just want to catch something, the reliable redside is your friend indeed. Trout are happily eating caddis in all forms - nymph, emerger, and dry fly. The Euro-style nymph fishers have been finding lots of success way down deep in August - the trout love the cooler waters 6-8 feet below the surface of the Deschutes. Come on in and check out our great selection of both trout and steelhead flies.

One last note, it takes considerable time and effort to continually update the report to share the river conditions with all of you. If you appreciate these reports, please consider shopping with us either in the store, online, or over the phone. We are always here - open daily 8-5. We are always willing to help find you the exact item you need to make your fishing experience better, and we will only survive to bring you all of these updates if anglers continue to support our store. Just food for thought in this crazy-competitive market of online fly fishing retail: I doubt that Amazon, EBay, or any warehouse/big box store will be reporting on the condition of the White River any time soon. Also, THANK YOU to all of our loyal customers!! We know who you are, you know who you are, THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!

Tight lines! Amy Hazel and the gang at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop in Maupin, Oregon.

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

August 26, 2019

Yesterday, John and I floated from Pine Tree to Mack's on a fun float with the staff of the Deschutes River Alliance. We thought the river was going to be extremely muddy, as the White River had completely blown out on Friday night, but we were pleasantly surprised to find that the Deschutes was fairly clear and certainly fishable. The clarity improved over the course of the day and we were excited and hopeful for anglers to have only lost one day. We saw tons of raft