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FISHING REPORT

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Thursday, October 10, 2019 8:30 AM

Got a huge surprise last night, and not a good one, when John pulled off of the river and found that the further up river he drove the muddier the Deschutes looked. Muddier and muddier until the river had only 1-2 INCHES of visibility - damn that White River! When will it be done with this nonsense?? It is COLD out here in the morning - low 20s this morning and last, so bring your warm gear for the early morning fishing sessions. We have been hooking steelhead and trout consistently over the past few weeks, though we are mostly fishing for steelhead at this time of year. Evan spent the day fishing with Devin Olson (Euro-nymphing expert) yesterday and they hooked steelhead swinging flies before exploring the depths of the river using Euro-nymphing techniques. They proceeded to hook tons of trout during the mid-day and a few more steelhead that were willing to grab a tiny nymph. Sounded like a great day, and everyone drove off the river just before the Wicked White River had her way with the lower Deschutes. It should clear quickly, so we will keep you informed of that development.

The private lakes are open and fishing really well right now - reports from anglers who have ventured up there in recent weeks have been excellent.

We are gearing up for the John Day season now - lots of camp trips going out for in the coming weeks and the John Day has a decent amount of water in it. There are still a couple of spots up for grabs, so think about an amazing four day float amongst wild steelhead, guided by the best in the business. Our camps on the John Day are second to none - we have two camp hosts who are paid to do nothing more than make sure your camping experience is top-notch. You will enjoy stand-up walk-around canvas tents for sleeping, a huge wall tent for dining and hanging out, a circle of chairs around a fire pit every evening, and phenomenal knock-your-socks-off meals cooked hot and fresh on the water.

Get yourself out to the river any way you can or this steelhead season is going to pass you by.

Tight lines! Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler.

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Friday, October 4, 2019 5:50 AM

Friday morning fishing report brought to you by Amy Hazel.... Not much time to write, gotta guide. White River is probably done acting up for this year. Cold crisp temps and snow on the mountain have locked it down. Steelhead fishing has been decent in the lower 50 miles below the falls. Numbers of fish coming above the falls have improved over the past week. This is prime time on the Deschutes for steelhead, so now is the time to get off the couch and get to the river! Have a great weekend. Tight lines! Amy Hazel

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

Friday, September 27, 2019 8:30 AM

Friday morning fishing report brought to you by Amy Hazel.... Yesterday morning, I drove down to the White to take a look. It was so, I figured the river down low had about 2-3 feet of visibility. This morning, John and our former shop manager, Andrew Dutterer, went steelhead fishing down below the White River. I talked to them just before 8:00 AM and was pleased to hear that they had just landed their first steelhead in a spot that Andrew named years ago: The Catcher's Mitt. This morning the visibility in the lower river is decent - John says 2-3 feet. The steelhead that Andrew hooked and landed was caught while swinging an unweighted small hairwing fly (Dutt's Addison)on floating line - no sink tip needed. However, not long after that conversation, Nick drove down river to take a group on a trout trip and turned around when he saw how bad the White River had become. So, my guess is that a huge mudflow just hit the Deschutes and will be working its way downriver over the next 24 hours. Alex called me at 10:00 AM to say that the water he was fishing (and his guys got one steelhead so far this morning) was looking dirtier and dirtier, so the mud was probably just reaching him at that time. John just got back to the shop at 11:30 and said he thought the White River sent a little mud down at 9:00 and as he drove up river it seemed to be getting clearer. So, there you go...

Conditions of the lower Deschutes are ever changing. The steelhead return is rumored to be poor, but we are not finding the doom and gloom forecast to be exactly true. In the past week we have hooked and landed quite a few steelhead on our guided trips. John, visiting from NYC, was pleased to hook his first ever dry fly skated steelhead (on a bomber) as well as bunches more on muddlers. Rick and Dick did a camp trip with Evan and brought several steelhead to hand. The steelhead are spread out throughout the river at this point.

Yesterday, Oregon and Washington Fish and Wildlife added the Columbia River to the list of rivers closed to steelhead and salmon fishing. This will, no doubt, put more pressure on rivers like the Deschutes, the Klickitat, the Hood, the John Day, and the Grande Ronde.

Tomorrow - Saturday - the Deschutes River Alliance will be participating in the river clean up with the BLM in the morning from 9 AM to Noon followed by a BBQ here in Maupin in the park right next to our shop. We will be there cooking up burgers and hot dogs, there will be microbrew beer from Freebridge Brewing in the Dalles, and we can meet and greet all of the anglers who love the Deschutes and want to see it protected. We will have a few tents set up just in case, but the forecast that once called for rain has been adjusted to a 29% chance of a shower and the wind forecast has also been dialed back. Come on down if you can, the more the merrier!

Trout fishing has continued to be good on the Deschutes. Nymphs that represent caddis pupa or Euro nymphs with hot spots have been working very well for people. Tomorrow the blue winged olive hatch should be epic with the overcast weather and hint of rain.

As I was finishing up this fishing report, I got a call from a guy who came out here this week to camp on the river's edge and enjoy some trout fishing. He did what most of us do when we arrive at a campsite, he staked his claim to the site by laying out his camp stove, BBQ, Lantern, cooler full of food, etc. His stuff was on a picnic table at Longbend Campground - just upstream from Maupin and right out in the open. He drove upriver to fish, came back down river, saw his stuff at the campground, went down river to fish and returned to find all of his camping stuff GONE. Stolen. This is very rare on the Deschutes, but it can happen. The guy told me that he saw a suspicious beater grey car parked near the campsite with a couple of guys in it, but he thought nothing of it. Keep an eye on your stuff and hopefully these guys will be caught.

Tight lines!

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 24, 2019 5:30 AM

67,000 steelhead are swimming in the Columbia River basin this year. 67,000. To many of you, particularly to those who have been steelhead fishing for decades, this number is low and quite disappointing because of what you have seen in years past. To those budding enthusiasts who have picked up a two-handed rod for the first time in the past couple of years, this is your normal. In this world of changing climate and ocean blobs, this is likely the New Normal - but we are uncertain about that because salmon and steelhead are amazingly resilient creatures who take on challenges like changing their bodies to adapt to living in saltwater after being reared in freshwater, like swimming downstream as little tiny babies and navigating through several dams, dodging seals, sea lions, cormorants, orcas, and other fish in the ocean. They survive and thrive somehow despite all of the obstacles they face, swimming hundreds of miles upstream as adults to reach their home waters. Once they have reentered the freshwater environment, they must navigate around gill nets that are strung throughout the Columbia River. One wrong turn could mean entanglement and a slow death by drowning while the nylon net rips the slime and scales off of their writhing bodies. Since they are not the prized Salmon, they are more likely to be tossed overboard to float belly up down the Columbia than they are to take up space in a cooler full of Chinook bound for a fish market on the side of I-84. If they are lucky enough to make their journey without dying in a gill net, they enter their chosen tributary and start moving upstream, holding temporarily in front of big boulders to surf the cushion of a wave and to catch a quick rest. Some will yield to their predator instinct or maybe to curiosity when a fly swings through their window of vision- a muddler dancing in the surface film will not go unnoticed by any steelhead - and they will take a fly into their mouth and turn with it before feeling the sting and the weight of the piercing in the corner of the mouth. Fight. Flight. A high leap and a cartwheel may help spit the hook, or it may just be the thing that thrills the angler on the other end of the line and fuels the fire to return to the river season after season in hopes of another such encounter.

John picked his clients up this morning in the pre-dawn darkness. They have been fishing with him 3-4 trips per year for at least 25 years. The trips have shortened over those many years from 5 days to 2-3 days, not because of the fishing but because of the wear and tear on the 60, 70, and 80 year old bodies. There are a million little reasons that they might throw in the towel and call it quits - but they are still making their annual pilgrimage to the Deschutes to fish for steelhead also on a pilgrimage. Balance fades with age, so wading staffs, knee braces, and inflatable safety vests are are commonly being donned as the guys gear up each morning - headed out to battle the swift river currents and slippery rocks. Ron, who is fishing with his brother this week, is here for his second trip in two weeks. He has one more trip next month. He comes for two days at a crack now, enough time to put in a solid effort without complete and total exhaustion at the end of the trip. Ron is an incredible and prolific fly tyer who has been an inspiration to me and all of my guides. After last week’s trip, Ron left his gear bag and fly boxes (six suitcase fly boxes and countless Wheatley boxes) with us and asked us to choose our favorite flies from box after box of spectacular patterns. John and I poured over the thousands of flies and chose our favorites, which we set into three different framed display cases. You can check them out here in the shop.

While I was writing this report in the pre-dawn hours, I got a phone call from John just after he launched his boat. Ron had left his gear bag containing fly boxes and his wallet sitting in front of his hotel room at the Deschutes Motel. I jumped into the old Landcrusier and climbed up the hill to the motel with the choke knob pulled out to the max. There was the bag, sitting next to the shoes that Ron had ditched just before climbing into his waders. I grabbed it and headed down the hill and down the river just as it was starting to get light enough to fish. I passed by five or six of my favorite steelhead runs and was shocked to see them all wide open during the prime time of late September. As I approached the White River I was confident that I would see it in the same condition that I had seen it in 16 hours before, as the weather is cold and there has not been any rain to speak of. Nope. It was significantly higher in volume and thicker in muddiness – enough so that the Deschutes below the confluence looked fairly brown. As I drove down river to find John and the boys, the river cleared somewhat and looked quite good by the time I reached the spot they were fishing. I delivered the gear bag and mentioned that a mud plume might be headed their way. As I drove back up river, there was no doubt that the river got dirtier and dirtier as I neared the confluence with the White River. Was the mud settling out as it flowed downstream? Or, was this the beginning of a big mud plume? Without setting up camp at the White River Campground to watch the mixing of the dirty and clean water for the next few hours, it was impossible to know. What I do know is that I check on and report on the White River more than anyone on the planet. It is a thankless job with no reward. I get yelled at by people in the fly shop because the White River got muddy between the time they read my report and the time they arrived in Maupin. I have been accused of RUINING people’s trips because they brought their jet boat and found the river too muddy to fish after their first day of fishing clean water. Somehow, I am to blame when Mother Nature changes the White River. I saw a fishing bulletin board online yesterday where a guy says this:

“Got word from fly shop in Maupin yesterday morning that White River was muddy but not affecting Deschutes with very low flow. I packed up and drove down. WRONG! Turned around and headed home. Perfect above White but fish not there yet in numbers.”

Really? You drove all the way here and you stood on the edge of the Deschutes where the conditions were perfect and you turned around and headed home? While you stood there and determined that the river was not fishable – if you were here on the 10th of September – I had three guide boats below the White and all of them hooked steelhead. I had one boat above the White and they hooked steelhead. How does this guy determine the numbers of fish above the White River? After the Dalles dam there is NO ACCURATE COUNT of the steelhead migrating. ODFW has a guy at Sherar’s Falls on some of the days trapping a few migrating fish at night, but he traps only those fish that utilize the fish ladder during a very short window of time – not the hundreds or thousands that migrate as they have done for millennia by jumping up the falls. I talk to lots of anglers in this shop and lots of guides working the river. There are plenty of steelhead being hooked above Maupin and have been since mid-July.

Fishing conditions are unpredictable. That is part of the adventure. Even with today’s technologies, there will always be some measure of steelhead fishing that will remain a mystery. Will the steelhead be in the runs that I choose to fish? If they are there, will they follow my fly? Will they like the fly I have chosen? Will they (or even one fish) be willing to grab my fly? If I get lucky and a steelhead does grab my fly, will it turn hard and run or will it drop slowly back and feel like a slow and steady pull of the loop from my fingers? Should I carry a loop? Should I fish floating line? Would a sink tip work better? Are water temperatures too warm? Is the sun at a good angle, or is it blinding the steelhead sitting in this run? Should I change my tippet size? SO many questions float through the angler’s mind in the faint light in the wee hours of the day.

Personally, I fish with total confidence with the floating line, unweighted small hairwing pattern or muddler, and a floating leader. I have seen hundreds of steelhead come to the surface to grab a fly. I have watched hundreds come up to inspect a size 3 fly with flash only to turn away at the last second without touching it but the very same fish will crush a size 8 hairwing pattern minutes later.

Confidence is key to success in steelhead fishing. Confidence comes from lots of experience. Confidence is gained through time on the water, through trial and error, and through time spent with other anglers more experienced than oneself. You must have confidence in your fly pattern. You must be confident that the water you are fishing is prime, grade A steelhead water – the most likely runs to hold steelhead during their journey upriver. The great thing is that the river is far less busy this year and that opens up quite a bit of the GRADE A water. Another great thing is that wild steelhead make up over 50% of this year’s run, where they only made up 20-25% of the run on big number years. The greater the percentage of wild fish, the better, because they are far more aggressive to the fly than their hatchery counterparts. So, the percentage of grabby fish is up and that should get any fly angler excited.

We are about to announce on social media a couple of openings during our six week season on the John Day River. Here is a 100% wild steelhead tributary of the Columbia which fishes well through November and December if the weather allows. We run the best outfitted camp trips on the John Day River, doing all the work of rowing and moving camps down river while you enjoy luxury safari-style tent camping with gourmet meals and lots of camaraderie around the campfire. I know that some of you normally fish the Clearwater in Idaho in late October or November and, unfortunately, Idaho has recently closed the Clearwater to steelhead fishing. Here is your chance to experience another Northwest gem with some of the finest steelhead guides on the planet. Give us a call at the fly shop if you want to get one of our remaining john Day camp trip spots.

Private lakes are open now and getting less weedy by the day as the cool nights become the norm. We can accommodate quite a few groups on our private lakes, so give us a ring if you want to go hook a bunch of nice fat rainbows.

Tight lines,

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 23, 2019 6:30 PM

Checked the White River this afternoon around 1:00 PM - it was muddy but the Deschutes below the confluence looked great. It could change. However, fresh snow on the mountain and the weather getting colder bodes well for the river staying clear and fishable for the rest of the year. If things change, we will keep you posted. Tight lines!

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 20, 2019 9:15 AM

We drove down to the White River this morning to check things out and it looks like it has dropped a bit and is on its way to clearing. I would estimate visibility down in the lower river to be 2 feet or slightly better. We hope it continues to improve but rain showers may cause it to get worse.

Tight lines! Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 19, 2019 7:40 AM

Just woke up to the news that the rain finally pushed the levels of the White River way up and it is now blowing out the entire Deschutes. Over the previous two days, the rain was falling but the White River held up and we were fishing on the lower river with success. Unfortunately, that all changed sometime last night and the lower river is now a mess. We fielded a lot of phone calls yesterday and gave people the news that the White was still okay - which it was through about 6:00 PM yesterday the last time we looked at it. We will let you know when the situation changes. I have a class this morning and will try to get down there to take a photo. I can't post it here, so you will have to follow deschutesangler on Instagram or Facebook to see the photos. Tight lines! Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 11, 2019 10:10 AM

Just drove down to the White River confluence to take a look and (right now) the volume of the White River is too low for the muddy water joining the Deschutes to have a negative impact of fishing the lower 50 miles of the river. As long as the cooler weather continues and we don't have any major rain events, the lower Deschutes should remain in good shape.

If you like fishing clearer water, then you may want to fish in the Maupin area. There are not as many steelhead up above the falls as you will find below the falls, but fishing clear clean water does have a certain appeal. The fish are distributed throughout the system, which is normal for this time of year, though the fishermen are few and far between. It should be quite easy to fish the prime pieces of water - you have almost zero competition. On my drive to the White River this morning I saw maybe 6 people fishing in a 7-8 mile stretch of river. Nearly all of those people had big indicators on their fly rods so they appear to be trout fishing or perhaps nymphing for steelhead. Don't hesitate to follow a nymph fisherman through a classic big run, they cover very little of the water using nymphs. Swinging flies will cover 50 times the area of water that nymphing will in a fraction of the time. The only problem in following a nymph angler down a run could be the pace at which they are moving. Nymphing tends to be quite stationary, so you might go fish a different piece of water and return to the run where the nympher was later to reach all the spots he/she missed.

Today is the 18 year anniversary of the 9/11 attack on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon. I was guiding two steelhead anglers on the river above Maupin on that day, floating from Nena to Wapinitia for the morning session, taking a mid-day break, and planning to fish along the road in the afternoon. I had a great morning and it was a beautiful day just like this one. I remember my clients hooking 3-4 steelhead in the morning, and one of the rare circus trains came up the tracks with all the animals in cages and the circus freaks hanging out the windows watching the river go by. At lunchtime, we pulled into the boat ramp and a bagger from a trout trip upriver told us that something horrible had happened in New York City and thousands were dead. We quickly ate lunch, loaded the boat on the trailer, and drove down river with the local radio station playing country music - no news at all about what was going on. I dropped the guys at their hotel (C&J Lodge) to take a nap in the A/C and I drove home to see what the fuss was all about. I turned on the TV and couldn't believe what I was seeing - the towers had fallen by that time and everyone on the news was freaking out. I looked over at the blinking light on the answering machine and listened to panicked messages from the family members of the people who were on guided trips with John and with Dec Hogan who was working for us at the time. One message was from a wife desperate to connect with her husband and kids, the other was from Dec's wife, another was from my mom, and so on. Knowing that the guys dwn river should have an idea of what was going on, I drove down river like a maniac in order to find John. By this time there were no commercial jets anywhere to be found in the wide open skies above Maupin, but there were fighter jets zipping around. I found John and his guys napping across the river and yelled out to them. John rowed over to get me and rowed me back so that I could tell everyone what had happened. One guy hiked to the top of the canyon to try to get a cell signal to call his wife. John shrugged and said that there was nothing we could do about it, so their fishing day went on as planned. He rowed me back across the river and I went to the hotel that afternoon to pick my guys up to fish the evening session. It was an eerie day. That night at the Rainbow Tavern we watched the towers fall over and over again and made plans for what to do in the coming week since none of our out of town clients could get to Maupin - all flights were cancelled. Some clients drove up from California or down from Washington, and we went on fishing as usual. Patriotism was at an all-time high - American Flag bumper stickers appeared on every vehicle and the stars and stripes were on display everywhere at half mast. It wasn't until days later that I learned that one of my high school classmates, Gordy Aamoth, was in the Twin Towers that day. Gordy was 32 and pursuing his dream of being an investment banker. Unfortunately, Gordy did not make it out of the building and perished on that day. His name is alphabetically the first one on the list of 9/11 victims that they read aloud each year. The football stadium at my high school is named after Gordy, and the school erected a 9/11 memorial on campus which features a beam from the twin towers. My thoughts on this day are with the Aamoth family and the families of so many others who were lost that horrible day. May we never forget.

Tight lines, Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 9, 2019

The power was out for about an hour this morning, so our phones were down and the lights were off. It just came on at 9:30 AM and we are back in business! Before work I drove down the river to see what the conditions are right now. We had some more rain last night and I was worried about the White River jumping in volume. The good news is that the White River is still low and, though it is the color of a latte or a chocolate milkshake, the White River is not putting enough color into the lower Deschutes to negatively impact the steelhead fishing below the confluence. The lower river will have a tinge of steelhead green water, but it is not too bad right now.

The small tributaries that caused the Deschutes to be a muddy mess yesterday morning have all dried up and are no longer dirtying the Deschutes above the White River. Things have cooled off around here and the forecast calls for a few more sprinkles today but no serious rain.

What is interesting to me is that I did not see one single steelhead or trout angler this morning as I drove down to the White River and back. I guess people are looking at the Columbia River dam counts and they are making the decision that the steelhead run is too low to be worth chasing steelhead this year. Well, there are really no promises out there that future years will be better, so I would go fishing now and enjoy the opportunities that we have presently. There are at least 11,000 steelhead above The Dalles dam that could potentially be headed up the Deschutes river and there are over 60,000 steelhead in the Columbia river above Bonneville dam. Those are huge numbers, folks, huge. They may be a fraction of what we once had, but they are still huge numbers of steelhead with potential to swim into the Deschutes River. If you sit at home waiting for things to get better, you are certain to get skunked!

Trout fishing is solid right now, and you can read a bit more about that in other fishing reports below. This report was focused mainly on the ever changing condition of the Deschutes River and the White River in particular.

Tight lines, Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

September 8, 2019

We had a huge series of thunderstorms here last night which caused the entire river to blow out - but temporarily. We had a push of mud coming through between 7 AM and 8 AM, then the river above the bridge in Maupin cleared up quickly and the main tributary spewing mud was Bakeoven Creek which enters the Deschutes just downstream from the bridge in Maupin. Bakeoven is causing the Deschutes to have a brown hue all the way down to the White River and below. The White River this morning at 9:30 AM was not bad - the river itself is super muddy but the volume of water is fairly low and is not causing major problems on the lower Deschutes. At least not right now.

I was in Canada last week on the Bulkley River, so a fishing report did not get written while I was gone, but the White River has continued to impact the lower Deschutes off and on for the past 8-9 days. If you have a trip planned for the lower section of the Deschutes, go for it. You may lose a few hours here and there with surges of muddy water pushing out of the White, but there will be big open windows of clear enough water to enjoy swinging a fly on a floating line. The hot weather may be behind us now, and the rains on Mt. Hood are turning into snow. This is the time of year I love the most - here comes the crisp, cold, fall weather (hopefully)!

For those BC steelhead enthusiasts who are curious about the week of fishing I just had on the Bulkley - the river did not have a lot of fish in the system. We had four good anglers and a jet boat and we fished hard for five days from Smithers up and down river - up as far as Telkwa and downstream a ways from Smithers. The river was in perfect shape, but the steelhead were few and far between. One angler in our party landed a steelhead. One. No other steelhead were hooked, boiled, bumped, or encountered. None. It was still a really fun trip with a bunch of great guys, but the steelhead did not participate in the trip. The bears did! We saw 1-4 black bears each day, several times they walked down to the river while we were fishing a run, got a drink of water, and walked back into the woods to nap. The game warden on our last day on the Bulkley said that he had checked 78 anglers over two weeks from Telkwa downstream below Smithers and Derek (the guy in our group) was the first guy he had checked who had landed a steelhead. We fished floating lines, skaters, muddlers, wet flies and even a sink tip though a couple of runs, just to check. The fish were just not around during the week that we were there. On the bright side, conditions were good so the fishing should pick up as soon as a few more steelhead enter the Bulkley. At the airport we talked to anglers coming off the Babine where the fishing was also tough but not completely void of fish. After last year's big returns up on the Skeena drainage, there are bound to be a few anglers with expectations that will be difficult to meet. But, that is steelhead fishing. No matter what you spent to get to the destination, no matter how much you spent on your gear, no matter how great the flies are that you tied for months leading up to the trip, the river doesn't OWE you anything. YOU owe the river and the fish for giving you the opportunity to stand in one of the most beautiful places on earth and do something that you love to do. The rhythm of the casting and the quiet solitude of our wild steelhead rivers are gifts to your soul in equal measure, I would argue, as the boil on a dry fly or the yank on a wet. It is rare to set aside so many hours in a week for simple quiet reflection while swinging a fly. No phone, no internet, no music, no distractions other than the birds flitting in the trees just far enough away to escape positive identification or the odd black bear wandering the banks or swimming the river to get to the island on the other side.

Trout fishing should be good once the dirtier water flushes out of the Bakeoven creek. The drainage is short, so we expect that the muddy waters of the Deschutes just below Maupin will clear quickly today.

Tight lines,

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

August 28, 2019

The White River has been surging with mud on and off for the past five days. Each surge brings a lot of mud and a wave of dirty, zero-visibility water that will push its ugliness all 47 miles to the mouth angering fishermen all along the way. These waves are not entirely predictable, but there is clean water to be found somewhere in the lower Deschutes River at some time during the day. If you have two-three feet of visibility in the morning session of fishing, you might expect dirty water to reach you by the afternoon-evening session. As the water flows downstream, since it is more mud than silt, the dirt seems to settle out a bit with each river mile it flows.

I have no idea how long the White River will continue to do this to the Deschutes, it might end today or it may last until the weather up on the mountain gets down into freezing temperatures in the evenings. I am not a geologist, hydrologist, or volcanologist, but the blow out might be due to thermal venting on the volcano heating up long frozen parts of the glacier and causing them to melt quickly. That is one interesting theory. A less intriguing theory is that the glacier melts during the heat of the day, the river jumps in volume and silt, and the mud surge makes its way down the White River then down the Deschutes River. On Sunday the worst of the mud seemed to be flowing out of the White River between 3:00 PM and 6:00 PM. I have not been driving down to the confluence of the White and Deschutes every day multiple times per day, so I cannot say that the timing of the mud surges is consistent daily or completely random. If anyone wants to spend their day sitting at White River Campground watching and documenting the color of the White River as it changes throughout the day, please let me know how that day of observation goes.

The good news for all of you anglers is this: unless you have committed to a float in the lower section of the river or a jet boat trip, it is possible to make a change of plans to allow yourself the option to fish in the super clean and clear water of the Deschutes above the confluence with the White River. From Maupin, you have 15 miles of crystal clean steelhead water to fish between the confluence of the White River and a few miles above the locked gate. A fair percentage of the steelhead in the Deschutes have made their way to the Maupin area to enjoy the cooler water temperatures as they swim farther and farther from the mouth and from the lower river where the water is warmer and slower.

Steelhead will migrate up and down the Deschutes from now until the months of February and March when they get ready to spawn. They don't stay in one place and they don't read the reports from various sources that place the entire run of Deschutes steelhead in the stretch of river below Mack's Canyon. They are spread out everywhere and will continue to spread out for the next five months, the bigger fish finding the best holding water in each boulder-strewn run on the river. All you have to do is go out on the water, cover as much water as you possibly can, and hope that you have an encounter with a steelhead that is willing to grab your fly.

If steelhead are causing you frustration and you just want to catch something, the reliable redside is your friend indeed. Trout are happily eating caddis in all forms - nymph, emerger, and dry fly. The Euro-style nymph fishers have been finding lots of success way down deep in August - the trout love the cooler waters 6-8 feet below the surface of the Deschutes. Come on in and check out our great selection of both trout and steelhead flies.

One last note, it takes considerable time and effort to continually update the report to share the river conditions with all of you. If you appreciate these reports, please consider shopping with us either in the store, online, or over the phone. We are always here - open daily 8-5. We are always willing to help find you the exact item you need to make your fishing experience better, and we will only survive to bring you all of these updates if anglers continue to support our store. Just food for thought in this crazy-competitive market of online fly fishing retail: I doubt that Amazon, EBay, or any warehouse/big box store will be reporting on the condition of the White River any time soon. Also, THANK YOU to all of our loyal customers!! We know who you are, you know who you are, THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!

Tight lines! Amy Hazel and the gang at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop in Maupin, Oregon.

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

August 26, 2019

Yesterday, John and I floated from Pine Tree to Mack's on a fun float with the staff of the Deschutes River Alliance. We thought the river was going to be extremely muddy, as the White River had completely blown out on Friday night, but we were pleasantly surprised to find that the Deschutes was fairly clear and certainly fishable. The clarity improved over the course of the day and we were excited and hopeful for anglers to have only lost one day. We saw tons of raft and driftboat trailers being shuttled to the mouth - so we know it was very busy in the river below Mack's Canyon over the weekend - but it was pretty quiet on our float. We pulled out at around 5:00 PM at Mack's Canyon and started the long drive up the washboard access road. A few miles up river from Mack's I noticed that the color of the river seemed to be changing a little bit. A few miles further up the road I thought maybe the angle of the sun was playing tricks on my eyes the way it was reflecting on the water - causing it to look a lot more white than it had all day. By the time we got up to Pine Tree it was quite obvious that the river color was, in fact, getting worse, a LOT worse. That nice glacial green water with 2-3 feet of visibility had given way to a slate grey/brown/white. As we arrived at the confluence of the White River and the Deschutes, the volume of mud and silt pouring out of the White River seemed to have quadrupled since we viewed it at 9:15 that morning. The lower 47 miles of the Deschutes was soon to be too dirty to fish.

Upon return to the fly shop, John and I had a chat with guides Brian Silvey and Nick Rowell about the current condition of the White. They both had trips today and were able to change their game plan to fish in the waters above the White River around Maupin. We heard about other guides launching today for multi-day trips below Mack's who had no choice but to fish in the mud because they are operating out of jet boats and jet boats must stay below Mack's Canyon.

We are hoping that the White clears up soon, but this is the type of blow out that could not have been predicted or anticipated because it was not weather related. This type of blow out is the type I wrote about last Wednesday - it all happens at the White River Glacier. Ice dams form, water builds up behind them, ice dams break, surges of water rush down from the mountain and puke into the Deschutes. How long this will last is only known deep inside the glacier. In my first or second year of guiding we had an event like this that lasted for the entire month of September. It has been over 20 years since we have seen a blow out last that long, but it is a possibility.

We will keep posting updates throughout the week. I may have to break out the drone before I leave on vacation on Sunday the 1st. Once I leave for a week, the updates will be fewer and farther between, but I am hoping by then that the White River will have cleared up.

I am headed to the Bulkley to fish with a couple of good buddies for a week. Marty, Mark, Derek, and I will be buzzing about in Mark's jet boat - looking for a few chromers on floating lines and skated flies.

Tight lines! We will see you on the river.

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

August 24, 2019

On Wednesday I wrote about the White River and I should have left well enough alone. Yep, the White River completely blew out sometime last night and it is blowing out or in the process of blowing out the entire Deschutes below the confluence of the two rivers. I am not sure if it rained on the mountain last night or what, but apparently the White bumped up in volume enough to impact the Deschutes negatively. This does not show on the graph of the White River flow that we have in the Local Information link because that flow number comes from this mathematical equation: Moody Flow minus Madras Flow minus the flow of a few other tributaries. In order to know if the White River bumped up in volume, you have to wait until that bump in volume flows out of the white river and 47 more miles to the mouth. It takes 10 hours for the water to get from the mouth of the White to the mouth of the Deschutes where the Moody gauge is located.

We will keep you posted as we know anything else about the color of the Deschutes. This is going to be a big bummer for people on jet boats trips in the lower river or overnight camp trips down below Mack's Canyon. There are plenty of great pieces of water in the river upstream of the mouth of the White River - so you will certainly be able to swing flies for steelhead in clear water if you wish to do so. Head on up to the Maupin area.

Tight lines,

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

August 21, 2019

Hello fellow anglers! Here's a little Wednesday morning fishing report for you - outta the blue! Enjoy!

Hot muggy temperatures and temps in the 90s gave way to cooler days for the next few. Summer is trying to make its presence known before September is upon us - or so the ten-day forecast shows. These hot temps should result in good caddis hatches for the trout anglers. Tonight and Friday night look like the best days for potential mayfly hatches - due to the fact that those two days are forecast to have a little cloud cover and some possible rain. Mayflies prefer the cloudy days. Nymph fishing should be very good no matter the weather - and the further we get from the full moon that we had last week, the better the trout fishing should get. I am not really sure what it is about the full moon - but generally the trout fishing gets a bit more challenging during a full moon. Maybe they eat all night with the aid of the light of the moon, or maybe the hatches are not as good. Anyway - the full moon is behind us now and the trout fishing is back on track.

Let's talk about river conditions....specifically, the White River. If you are not familiar with the White River, count yourself lucky to know nothing about this pesky little tributary of the Deschutes. She (the White River) has been pretty well behaved over the last year or so - I can't even think of one time last year that she caused trouble in the Deschutes - which is a trend that I hope will last through this year's steelhead season. When we are talking trouble, we are talking about the fact that the White River can completely blow out the Deschutes and make visibility below the confluence of the two river less than inches. The sheer volume of mud and silt that the White River can puke is astounding! The puking can sometime last for days, weeks, or even a full month as it did back in early September of 2000 - rendering nearly 47 miles of river unfishable. Though there were far fewer guides and fewer steelhead anglers back then, the Deschutes above the White got awfully darn busy, as it was the only clear water to fish. The blowout of 2000 lasted a month, which is a very long stretch of time for the White River to be nasty. Over my 20 plus years out here I have experienced White River blowouts that last only a few hours, a day, a few days, a full week, and even a full month.

Though it is a frequent request of anglers who call the shop to ask about the condition of the White River, it is IMPOSSIBLE to predict how long any one blowout or puking event will last. Heavy rain can prolong the mud, but things happening up on the mountain at the actual White River Glacier can also have a long lasting impact. We surmise that the longest blowout periods are related to a dam being formed high on the glacier. When the glacial dam bursts wide open, the silt and pent-up water rush down the White River and into the Deschutes. This increased VOLUME of water is more detrimental than the actual silt, though the silt is super fine particulate that does not settle out quickly as mud is apt to do. Volume of flow in the White River is necessary to cause the Deschutes to blow out. No matter how WHITE the White River happens to be, if it has a low flow it will cause no harm to the Deschutes. Currently, this is the state of the White River. It is WHITE but the flow is extremely wimpy, thus no color is making it into the lower Deschutes. If and when that situation changes, we will let you know. We are hoping for a year like last year with no major blowouts - fingers crossed!

Steelhead are in the Deschutes now and are fairly well spread out throughout the lower 60 miles of the river. They have motivation to move up river in search of the cooler water temps they will find as they get away from the slow-moving waters down by the mouth. The good news is that the confluence of the Columbia River and the Deschutes is closed to all fishing through September 15 - that means that the guys in boats who used to sit at the mouth of the Deschutes intercepting Deschutes bound steelhead are no longer there to yard fish out of the river. The fishermen who sat on the island just inside the mouth of the Deschutes with a guantlet of spoons and side planers are not allowed to fish there this year through September 15 and not allowed to retain any steelhead (hatchery included) through the end of September. In the mainstem Columbia, steelhead retention (hatchery included) is banned through the end of August but one hatchery steelhead per day is allowed after September 1.

These regulations are a good start for protecting steelhead, but it would make more sense if the ban on steelhead retention in the month of August extended to all of the tributaries of the Columbia as well. Since hatchery steelhead retention is allowed on the Deschutes and other tributaries right now, the masses of meat hunting anglers are moving into the smaller rivers to fill their coolers. Rumor has it, the ODFW fish checker who sits at the outlet of the Mack's Canyon access road reported one car full of anglers blowing right past her stop sign and another group reporting that they had caught no steelhead - but the car behind them had seen them put a steelhead in their cooler (a steelhead they did not show to the fish checker because it was probably wild). Anglers who are on the river would be wise to keep their eyes open and be aware that this kind of illegal activity may be going on this year on the lower Deschutes. If would-be law breakers know that they have eyes on them, they will be less likely to haul a wild steelhead to their cooler.

Tight lines! See you on the water.

Amy Hazel, Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

August 15, 2019

This weekend is free fishing weekend - Saturday and Sunday only. This means that a license is not required to fish. You must still abide by all of the rules and regulations for fishing.

The long delay between fishing report updates (long for us) is due to the fact that three of us were up in BC fishing over the past two weeks - chasing summer steelhead. The rest of the crew was down here on the Deschutes also chasing summer steelhead and running trout trips as well.

We had a MEGA storm on Friday night which was full of lightning strikes and tons of rain. This storm, followed by another storm the next night, put some color in the Deschutes for a couple of days but the river cleared up in a few days and it is now back to being in good shape for the entirety of the lower 100 miles. I didn't write about the blow out in the fishing report because I knew it would clear in a matter of hours to days - the dirtiest water was on Saturday and Sunday and anglers who were out here over last weekend could clearly see that the rain had affected the condition of the river. There are so few anglers around during the week, at least right now, that the little bit of color in the water on Monday (it was clear by Tuesday) was not worth reporting. Despite a little color in the water, the river continued to fish well on Sun, Mon, Tues, and yesterday - both for trout and for the few steelhead that have been showing themselves. Evan's client landed a dandy 31" steelhead yesterday on a day trip, so they are starting to spread themselves out throughout the system. I would not be one bit surprised to hook steelhead while fishing around Maupin - we have always had good luck hooking them here in mid-August. The only issue with fishing at this time of the year is that water temps can get quite warm in the late afternoon. It is wise to get to the river early, fish hard all morning and early afternoon, and check temps in the evening - temps in the 67-69 degree range are going to not only put steelhead off the bite, but could very easily be lethal to a steelhead fighting at the end of your line. Self-imposed HOOT OWL hours (not fishing in the evenings when water temps are at their hottest) is the responsible thing for a steelhead angler to do during our heat spells. The warmest evening water temperatures are down by the mouth and temperatures get cooler and cooler as you make your way up river towards Maupin.

For trout anglers, there have been decent caddis hatches for dry fly fishing and the Euro nymphing has been steady and very good. A dry-dropper is another fun way to target the trout - using a bushy foamy dry on top and a dropper nymph below (I usually drop them 18-24" below the dry). Come on into the fly shop and we will share with you some of the trick patterns that have been working for us on the river.

Tight lines and we will see you out here soon!

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler Fly Shop

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

August 2, 2019

We have finally been hit with hot weather over the last week and surprisingly the trout fishing has been fantastic. The caddis and aquatic moths are out in huge numbers from early morning until late in the day. Normally I expect dry fly fishing to be slow in the heat of the day but that has not been the case over the last week. The nymph fishing has also been consistent for those of you hooked on the lastest fishing drug i.e. Euro Nymphing. We do have a couple spots left in our one day Euro clinic on August 17th if you are interested in upping your trout game. The fishing should continue to be strong until we get around the next full moon.

Steelhead are beginning to show up and anglers willing to get after it are finding a fish a day. Now is the time to get out and start swinging for those early fish that are by far the hottest of the season. I personally got smoked by a fish the other day and would put it in the top 5 hottest fish I have ever caught. We still have room in our late summer/early fall guide calendar for anyone interested in chasing these magnificent creatures. Our guides will make sure you are fishing the best water in the right light throughout the day and will help you perfect your cast and presentation. Give the shop a call if you want to get out (541)395-0995.

Tight Lines,

Deschutes Angler Crew

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

July 12, 2019

Quick update on the John Day River 30 mile access - the BLM was on top of things as soon as they heard that the road had blown out into the 30 mile boat launch. They repaired it within days and it is now open again, although flows are getting awfully low at this point. News is slow to come out of that area, so we apologize for not posting news of the repair sooner.

Trout fishing has been quite good lately on the Deschutes around Maupin. I am not sure about other areas because we spent nearly all of our time guiding the 40 mile stretch close to our fly shop. Upon request, we will do floats on other sections like the Warm Springs to Trout Creek section, but it is historically the heaviest trafficked area of the Deschutes for anglers and guides, so we like to show people a section of river that is far less busy and less pressured.

Yesterday was a historic day for our guide service - we had a group of 15 women on a one-day float. A bunch of media folks and social influencers for Yakima Racks and Toyota came out to the Deschutes for an introduction to fly fishing as well as an opportunity to photograph some new models of Toyotas on the river with Yakima roof racks. We had a great time showing the ladies the Deschutes as well as introduucing most of them to the sport of fly fishing. Though our time frame was a bit limited, we were able to catch a few nice trout and enjoy a beautiful day on the water. They guy in charge of keeping the cars dust free really had his work cut out for him on the lower access road! Despite those challenges, the cars looked great and you may see Beavertail campground in some upcoming advertisements for Toyota and Yakima.

July is upon us and we know that those willing to swing for the needle in the haystack just might be rewarded with a fine chromer of a steelhead. They are going to be somewhat sparse again this year, but that tends to keep the crowds at bay, so it all balances out in the long run. Please be respectful of your fellow angler, have plan A, B, C, D, E, F, G etc. so you don't feel the need to crowd or low hole the guy in your plan A. There aren't a lot of people out there swinging right now, so spread out and find your own stretch of water.

I will be heading for the Dean River in BC during the first week of August. Two of our guides, Nick and Alex, are also headed to the Dean during that time frame. They will be helicoptering in and camping while I am hosting a group of anglers at Kimsquit Bay Lodge on the lower Dean. If you are headed to BC or Alaska, be sure to check out our insane selection of steelhead and salmon flies - we have great stock of everything related to swinging for big anadromous fish.

If nymphing is your bag, you really owe it to yourself to take your game to the highest level. Take one of our Euro-Nymphing classes or, better yet, jump on one of the last spots left in our two day Euro-nymphing Camp July 24-25. One of the guys who took a class from us a few months ago was at the register this morning laughing and shaking his head in disbelief over how this technique has completely changed his game. He said that Euro-nymphing is as addicting as crack (though he did not look as though he had too much personal experience with crack). A lot of folks abandon the Deschutes in the hot summer months because they have trouble finding trout - that is no longer the case when you can effectively fish nymphs without an indicator at the right speed down deep. The Euro-Camp will not only encompass instruction, there will be a ton of fishing, learning to fish different water types, learning to tie Euro nymphs, and a great camping and dining on the river's edge. The Euro Nymph Camp is $795 for two days. Make an investment in your fish-catching future!

Recent hatches of caddis have been decent on the Deschutes. Aquatic moths and Yellow Sallies are around in so so numbers. The mayflies come and go with the cloudy days. The weirdest thing that we have noticed this year is the relative abundance of Cicadas on the lower river. Seeing one a day would have been an anomoly in the past - yesterday between five guides we saw dozens.

That's the report from the Deschutes! Tight lines!

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

July 5, 2019

July is here in Maupin. Stacks of rafts can be seen on main street in the morning and the rainbow tavern, which now has stickers, is a happening place into the wee hours. The fishing around town remains very good but if you are looking to avoid the raft traffic, focus your efforts below Sherars Falls. If you like the water close to town, it should be raft free in the morning and evening.

Trout fishing remains very good on the Deschutes River. There have been great caddis and PED hatches during the last hour of the day with trout looking up. Our favorite caddis pattern in the evening is a tan Fin Fetcher Caddis size 18. The pink post on this fly makes it easy to see in the flat light when the sun drops below the canyon wall. A size 12-14 light Cahill is perfect match for our PED’s. As the weather continues to heat up early morning dry fly fishing with dead caddis patterns in the heavy foam lines will be deadly. It is time to increase leader length and decrease tippet diameter. We like to fish 9 to 12 foot 5x leaders when fishing caddis. If you have a particularly wary fish going to 6x may make all the difference.

Evan and Alex have been guiding the last couple of days and they have had great fishing on a dry dropper set up. A size 14 purple or pink Chubby Chernobyl with a 3.3mm tungsten bead nymph trailed 24-30 inches off the dry was an outstanding combination. They found this combo to be more productive than fishing a dry caddis throughout the day.

We still have room in our one day Euro class on July 13th as well as room in our Euro Camp July 24th-25th. One day classes are $250 per person and the camp is $795.

We have some bad news from the John Day. We have heard from multiple sources that the road into Thirtymile boat ramp washed out over the weekend in a flash flood. From what we have heard, it is not currently possible to get down to the ramp with any type of vehicle. We have not heard news from BLM yet about the state of the road or when repairs will be completed. If you are looking for updated info about the road into Thirtymile call the Prineville BLM office (541) 416-6700.

It is July which means it is time to get up in the wee hours of the morning, grab a cup of coffee and swing the perfect steelhead fly through your favorite run on the lower river. There are not a lot of fish around but it only takes one and July fish are hot. Few things are as magical as watching light come to the Deschutes Canyon this time of year.

Hope to see you in the shop soon. Tight Lines.

Amy Hazel and the crew at Deschutes Angler.

DESCHUTES RIVER FISHING REPORT

FISHING LICENSES ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ANYWHERE IN MAUPIN - GO TO MYODFW.COM TO PURCHASE YOUR LICENSE

FLY SHOP HOURS: Open DAILY 8 AM to 5 PM

June 27, 2019 We have had some crazy weather lately and crazy good fishing to go along with it. Yesterday and the day before we were pelted by rain and even some heavy hail - but that certainly didn't keep the trout from biting. It has been great in the past few weeks with decent caddis hatches and some mayfly activity (PEDs mainly). Anglers adhering to a strict Euro-nymphing regimen have been slaying trout as well as anything else that swims in the river. The technique is scary effective and super fun. Next to dry fly fishing, Euro-nymphing is one of the coolest ways that I know of to catch trout. It takes some skill, but the more skilled you become, the more fish you catch. We are leading the charge with the best selection of Euro-nymphs available anywhere, a huge array of Euro-nymphing rods, and great deals on package outfits complete with rod, reel, line, and leader ready to fish. On top of all that, we have excellent instruction available with one-day clinics running nearly every weekend and a new two-day Euro-nymphing camp on July 24, 25. The camp will include instruction in the techniques of Euro-nymphing, tons of guided fishing time, great camp time with instruction on knot tying, instruction on Euro-nymph fly tying, and riverside cuisine. The first day will be a day of instruction with fishing sprinkled liberally throughout, and day two will be an eye-opening day of just how many different water types you can effectively fish using a Euro-nymph setup. The sooner you learn this technique, the sooner you can start humiliating your buddies on the river! We will provide all of the gear for the two-day class...other than flies and tippet...so you don't have to worry about having the right rod. $795 is the price of the camp and there are only six spots available - or there were six spots - some of the spots have already been filled. Call us to get in on this great camp trip on the Deschutes. 541-395-0995.

We have a one-day Euro school on July 13 - we just created this one because all of the other classes filled so quickly. That school is $250 for the day.

John Day bassin' trips are available now - choose between a multi-day float trip or a one-day float. Th

Call us: 541-395-0995